Richard Day

Coaching

Coaching for Personal and Business Success is an advanced way of fast tracking sustainable change in behaviour and results. Personalised one-on-one coaching and mentoring is a strong and unique partnership between coach and client which exists for the sole purpose of fostering and supporting the client's success in implementing new skills, tools or behaviours.
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What is Coaching?

The coaching process is designed to fast track your success so that you can make the most of your life and business opportunities.
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Types of Coaching:

Coaching is an extremely time efficient and valuable process that assists Managing Directors, Chief Executives, Managers, Small Business Owners, Employees and Individuals alike to move to the next level in personal performance, business growth, success, wealth creation and inner contentment.
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Research Supporting Coaching: 

Effective coaching can have a positive impact on an organisation. It can produce improved relationships and teamwork between staff at different levels. Employees have increased job satisfaction, which improves productivity and quality, and there is an overall improved use of people, skills and resources, as well as greater flexibility and adaptability to change.                                                                        

Organisational coaching can help to align individual performance with team and organisational objectives, maximise strengths, enhance communication between managers and teams, help individuals take ownership and responsibility for their behaviours and actions, and encourage individuals to stretch beyond their assumed constraints. A CIPD survey in 2004 found that 99 per cent of 500 respondents agreed that coaching could produce tangible benefits, both to the individual and the organisation.  Additionally: 

  • 93% agreed that coaching and mentoring are key mechanisms for transferring learning from training courses back to the workplace.
  • 92% agreed coaching can have a positive impact on the bottom line.
  • 96% agreed coaching is an effective way to promote learning in the organisation

Some researchers believe that the benefits of coaching can be broken down into strategic benefits and interpersonal benefits.  

Strategic Coaching can: help attract more business; improve customer service; provide structure, guidance and focus; help monitor and evaluate actions; guide individuals and streamline processes; promote initiative and accountability; encourage people to take responsibility; motivate people and improve skills, including the ability to communicate better; help retain staff; provide objective advice on business decisions; increase awareness of resources; broaden the scope of information, ideas and solutions; and show the organisation is socially responsible towards its staff                                                                                                 

Interpersonal Coaching can: unearth and tap potential and creativity; co-ordinate career and personal life; increase the ability to cope with and welcome change; improve concentration, confidence, relaxation and decision-making; remove performance fears and anxieties; and eliminate unhealthy stress at work. There are four key benefits which are explored in detail in the full report:

  • Retention of staff
  • Investing in training programmes can positively impact on an employee's feeling of self worth within the organisation.
  • Employees are more likely to remain in an organisation which they feel has an interest in them and their developing career.
  • Investment in, and modernisation of, learning and development methods are essential to ensure that care is provided by competent, supported and skilled professionals.
  • The "HR in the NHS Plan: More staff working differently" (DOH, 2002), clearly states that lifelong learning and development opportunities for enhancing and progressing employees careers are key objectives for improving the working lives of NHS staff.
  • Improving staff morale and ensuring good human resource management are also key objectives to achieving this goal. The plan calls for more flexible and innovative methods of providing learning and development, which suits the needs of staff. To do this it will be necessary to design more accessible methods of learning to support patient focused care and service change.
  • This has important implications for the organisation, as investing in coaching programmes is likely to create a pool of effective coaches for the future.
  • Increased communication.
  • In the current social and economic climate, the need for companies to have an up-to-date understanding of staff and customer needs is vital. Through coaching relationships, senior managers acting as coaches can communicate organisational decisions and ideas to coaches.

Cost effectiveness: 

Coaching relationships are a cost effective way for the organisation to foster and develop talent. The UCE (2004) study, found that there were three main benefits and key outcomes of coaching:

  • Business performance
  • Individual performance
  • Coaching process itself

A CIPD survey in 2004 found that 99 per cent of 500 respondents agreed that coaching could produce tangible benefits, both to individual and organisations.

Additionally:

  • 93% agreed that coaching and mentoring are key mechanisms for transferring learning from training courses back to the workplace
  • 92% agreed coaching can have a positive impact on the bottom line
  • 96% agreed coaching is an effective way to promote learning in the organisation

Some researchers believe that the benefits of coaching can be broken down into strategic benefits and interpersonal benefits.

Retention of staff:

  • Investing in training programmes can impact on employee's feeling of self worth within the organisation.
  • Employees are more likely to remain in an organisation which they feel has an interest in them and their developing career.
  • Investment in, and modernisation of, learning and development methods are essential to ensure that care is provided by competent, supported and skilled professionals.

Bush (2004) 22 studied client's perceptions of effectiveness in executive coaching. She identified six areas of effectiveness aimed at helping coaches and clients assess and improve the quality of their coaching engagements.

They are as follows: 1) the client is motivated and committed to the coaching process 2) they are working with a seasoned coach with whom there is positive rapport 3) the coaching engagement is supported by a structured process and focused on development 4) the profile of the coach should include the following: background, experience, expertise, roles, personal qualities and including others in the coaching process 5) results are achieved which benefit the client 6) there is a recognition that effective coaching involves sharing responsibility between the three stakeholders: client, coach and organisation.

In terms of the three stakeholders, she elaborated further and identified a number of elements for consideration: the client brings motivation, willingness to be coached, openness to the process and commitment to do the work: the coach provides experience, personal qualities that foster rapport, trust, credibility, tools, processes and resources that will benefit the client: the organisation offers a culture which supports development and learning, sponsoring and paying for structured programmes. She also went on to say coaches should continue to engage in their own professional development, organisations should give clients a role in coach selection and offer opportunities for coaches to learn about the organisation culture within which they operate.

Rock (2005) noted the growth of internal coaching for lower levels of staff. He identified key elements of best practice in executive coaching.

They include: linking it to organisational goals and strategies; careful choosing of an appropriate coaching model; managing the entire process for consistency and quality; building a team of quality, screened coaches; preparing staff in advance and not forcing anyone to engage in coaching; providing strong organisational support; ensuring coaches are grounded in the companies culture; allowing each coaching relationship to follow its own path; ensuring there are documented feedback loops and building measurement.

McGovern et al., 2001 United States. Interviewed 100 executives from 56 organisations between 1996 and 2000, the interviews with the executive's supervisor or human resource representative revealed that:

  • Return from coaching was 5.45 times the initial investment in coaching.
  • Tangible business impacts included: productivity 53%; quality 48%; organizational strength 48%.
  • Intangible business impacts included: improved relationships with reports 77%; improved relationships with stakeholders 71%; improved teamwork 67%; improved relationships with peers.
  • 84% of participants identified the quality of the relationship between executive and coach as critical to the success of the coaching.

Anderson, 2001 US MetrixGlobal LLC study: Questionnaire: (Part 1: Electronic, Part 2: Telephone) with 43 leadership development participants in a Fortune 500 firm.

  • Coaching produced a 529% return on investment and intangible benefits to the business.
  • 60% of the respondents identified tangible benefits: productivity (60% favourable), employee satisfaction (53%) and work output (30%).
  • Intangible benefits: employee satisfaction (theirs and others), customer satisfaction (53%) and work quality (40%).

Anderson, 2001 US MetrixGlobal LLC study: Interviews. Sample size not indicated. Executives in a Professional Services Firm - 55% of the leaders having worked with a coach for nine months or less and 45% having worked longer with a coach; and 25% having worked with a coach for over a year.

  • Coaching produced a 689% return on investment.
  • Top 3 competencies developed: leadership behaviour (82%); building teams (41%); and developing staff (36%).
  • 53%: significant improvements in relationships with peers and team members. 18% of the leaders even went on to significantly improve client relationships; gaining greater clarity about how their behaviour impacted clients and being better able to respond to client issues.
  • Senior leaders identified eight business areas that they expected executive coaching to impact and two cited as especially impacted by at least half of the leaders coached: teamwork (58%) and team member satisfaction (54%).

Bougae, 2005 US Data collection study: Mixed methods: Telephone interviews and questionnaires with six corporate leaders in a large, multinational telecommunications company.

  • Positive business outcomes: bringing a project in on time or launching a new product line
  • None of the executives were able to share quantifiable results which had been impacted by their participation in the executive coaching program.
  • Findings: 1. coaching was a positive experience; 2. coaching increased my self-awareness; 3. my interpersonal skills have improved; 4. Coaching impacted me personally; 5. coaching impacted my decision making; 6.being coached has the connotation that there is a performance problem; 7. feedback on my performance has improved; 8. I focus more on relationships and people; 9. it is important for the coach to be external; 10. my team / my organization is more effective; and 11. learning occurred during the coaching process.

Dagley, 2006 Melbourne, Australia: 17 HR professionals who were responsible for 1033 executive coaching engagements valued at a total of $15.3 million over two years.

  • All of the practitioners rated the coaching as at least ‘moderately effective'; six reported they were ‘very effective' and one reported the program was ‘outstandingly effective'. Highest benefits were ‘clearer understanding of own style, automatic responses and the issues arising from these'; ‘communication and engagement skills'; ‘ability to cope with stress'; a ‘clearer understanding of professional performance'; and ‘clearer understanding of organizational issues and how to resolve or overcome them'.
  • Key organisation benefits were seen to be ‘development of the talent pool' and ‘talent retention and morale'.

Contact Us:

To find out more and begin the process of accelerating your success in both business and life complete the online coaching enquiry form so that we can speak to you and organise an appointment to decide how to begin the process and how it should be structured to suit the individual involved.

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